Hospital through the eyes of patient

One Month Countdown ~ 100 Copies to Give Away!

It’s one month until Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU publishes. This unique graphic memoir, sometimes called Graphic Medicine (a visual story about medical-related issues), brings us an intimate portrait of a mother living in the hospital with her baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Author Jenny Jaeckel first published this book in Canada after winning the prestigious Xeric grant in 2008. For the first time on October 7th, 2016 Spot 12 will be available in the US market through a major distributor (Small Press United, a division of IPG).

Spot_12_Cover_90In honor of this big day, Raincloud Press has decided to give away 100 copies of Spot 12 through the Goodreads Giveaway program. The giveaway starts today and ends on October 2nd. You do have to be a member of Goodreads to enter the giveaway. But signing up is easy and you can set it up so you won’t get any junk mail.

If you have never checked out Goodreads, it is a social site for book lovers. It gives you an easy way to keep track of books you’ve read, how you liked them, and books you want to read. It’s very user-friendly and if you are considering reading a book, there are a ton of reviews that can help you decide. Writing reviews on Goodreads is a great way to support your favorite authors or publishers.

Here’s the link:

Goodreads Giveaway

or clink on the link in the sidebar

 

Cunero 12

Don’t forget that Spot 12 is also being released in Spanish (Cunero 12: Cinco Meses en la UCI Neonatales). Consider donating a pair of copies (in English and Spanish) for your local library, hospital or special needs organization and help support parents who have been through a difficult hospital stay.

Spread the Word

The most powerful force in the book world today is word-of-mouth. If you love Spot 12, pass it around to your friends. Tell family about it. Help spread the word of this brave and pioneering story. Thanks for your support!

Read More

Visit the website dedicated to Spot 12 for advance praise and Jenny Jaeckel’s Biography.

Visit Jenny Jaeckel’s blog for a continuation of the story that begins in Spot 12. 

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Raising a Special Needs Child

Asa_signs_cheese_150Raincloud Press author Jenny Jaeckel is sharing blog posts about the different stages of raising her daughter who had special medical needs. Her book, Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU, publishes in October and is about the first 5 months of her daughter’s life. But what happens after the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)?

Jenny answers those questions in her three posts so far: An Infant’s First Year Home from the NICU, Asa’s Tracheotomy: Learning Language, and Toddler Trach and Transitioning off her G-Tube. Her posts are a glimpse into their daily life and she writes with a great perspective and sense of humor.

Advance copies of Spot 12 are going out by the dozens to potential reviewers. If you are with the media or a blogger please contact me for your review copy: raincloudpress @ gmail dot com. For materials please visit: www.spot12book.com

Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU

Spot_12_Cover_90Spot 12 delivers the gritty details of a mother, a newborn, and a five-month stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in a visually gripping graphic memoir by Jenny Jaeckel. A routine prenatal exam reveals a dangerous problem, and first-time parents find themselves thrust into a world of close calls, sleepless nights, and psychological crisis. Surrounded by disagreements, deaths, extended family tensions, and questions of faith, the mother struggles to maintain a positive frame of mind.

Against the antiseptic, mechanical reality of the NICU, the dedicated health professionals are drawn as sympathetic and wry animal characters. Doctor Eyes and Nurse Gentlehands are two of the care providers that do all they can to take care of Baby Asa. But even the best hospital staff make mistakes, and Jaeckel and her husband’s vigilance must be acute. At times they battle feelings of helplessness, but their determination, insight, bravery, and connection ultimately helps keep their little one alive.